Atlas of Automation

With the "Atlas of Automation" AlgortihmWatch aims to map the state-of-the-art of automated decision-making (ADM) systems in Germany from a participatory perspective.

AlgorithmWatch’s  ‘Atlas of Automation’ provides an overview of ADM systems used in Germany that are relevant to participation. It is a compilation – in this case not of maps and graphics, but of topics that are relevant for addressing the question of how these systems affect access to public goods and services as well as exert civil liberties, especially for people who can be considered disadvantaged or marginalised. The Atlas refers not only to the potential for discrimination that results from the automation of processes and decisions, but also to opportunities and advantages that are made possible or conceivable through the use of automated decisions.

The Atlas provides an overview of the actors who have a decisive influence on the discourse about ADM: Authorities, research institutions, interest groups and non-governmental organizations. In addition, it summarizes existing regulatory approaches and consumer protection aspects of ADM systems with an impact on participation. Individual chapters cover the use of ADM systems in specific areas: Health and medicine, work, the Internet, security, education and more.

Part of the Atlas project is a freely accessible online database containing around 150 actors, regulations, software systems and technologies (available in German only). The database can be searched for products, type/methods, actors and regulations. Search results can be filtered by topic and keyword. This database of participatory ADM systems will be expanded continuously.

The ‘Atlas of Automation’ is available online at www.atlas-of-automation.net

 

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Out now: Atlas of Automation – Automated decision-making and participation in Germany

report

Automated decisions are part of our everyday lives and have a significant effect on the way we live – often without being aware of it. In order to use these systems it must be guaranteed that they are…

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